Author Archives: Antonia Oprita

Theresa May’s Florence Brexit speech is a disappointment

The excitement that had been building up before the Florence speech of UK Prime Minister Theresa May is quickly turning into disappointment. Many had expected the Prime Minister to find a way to unblock the stalled negotiations over Brexit, but the speech, as delivered, was far from achieving that.

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Brexit vote dramatically lowers Britain’s attractiveness

I know I have said it before, but at the time it was just a hunch: the price to pay for an “un-cool Britannia” after Brexit will be steep. Evidence for this is beginning to show. A survey released recently shows how fast Britain is losing attractiveness in the eyes of the world.

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Are ‘disruptors’ Amazon and Uber really to be admired?

Many people admire companies like Uber or Amazon for the speed with which they build market share and “disrupt” the competition. There is more and more talk about “Uberisation” and when retailers go bust, they are said to have been “Amazoned.”

But we should perhaps stop and think: are we in fact praising nothing else but the return to old-fashioned exploitation? These companies’ main, crucial competitive advantage is cheap labour. OK, technology helps, but if they were to treat people who work for them properly and pay them higher wages, they would not be as rich as they are now.

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Emmanuel Macron’s ‘posted workers’ reforms smell of populism

French President Emmanuel Macron went to Central and Eastern Europe recently to ask officials there to support his plan to change the legislation regarding posted workers, to prevent it being abused.

In essence, the posted workers’ directive allows one company in a member state of the European Union to send its workers to work on projects in another member state, but still pay them less than local workers. This is because, while the company has to abide by local minimum wage rules, things like tax or social security payments are still made in the country of origin.

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Libor manipulation suit could open the floodgates

The news that the US Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) is suing European banks in London for manipulating Libor should worry central bankers everywhere.

It’s all hush-hush, with details coming from reports in newspapers, rather than made public officially. The Financial Times reported that the FDIC is suing Barclays, Deutsche Bank, Lloyds Banking Group, Royal Bank of Scotland, Rabobank and UBS, as well as the British Bankers’ Association, accusing them of fraudulent misrepresentation.

Lloyds said it doesn’t believe the claim has any merit, while the others did not comment, according to the report.

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UK household wealth growth about to make a U-turn

The Bank of England has reason to pat itself on the back. During the financial crisis of 2007-2009, things could have taken a very ugly turn if it hadn’t cut interest rates to record lows and hadn’t started printing money.

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Brexit is no ‘Dunkirk’ movie; it’s real life

A recent article in Politico says that some European Union policymakers believe that Brexit negotiations are so chaotic on the British side because of a cunning plot to swamp the EU with well-prepared, profoundly thought-out position papers at the last minute.

“Having seen the movie ‘Dunkirk’ over the weekend, history might suggest that the British could turn disaster and disorganization around,” it quotes an European official as saying.

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As Brexit bites, there is little the Bank of England can do

The Bank of England will publish its inflation report next Thursday, and this time it will get even more attention than usual.

Brexit is being felt in prices more and more now, with the cost of grocery bills jumping and prices for essentials going up. The phenomenon of “shrinkflation” is in full swing as well; many products are mysteriously losing weight, but maintain their price.

No matter how much it would like to help (or to meet its inflation target), the Bank of England cannot do anything to prevent prices from rising. In fact, to be more accurate, it could, but it will not. The central bank could raise interest rates, stopping the pound’s depreciation — but if it does this, the housing market would crash.

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UK proposal for EU citizens post Brexit should worry everyone

The UK’s negotiations with the European Union started with a proposal regarding the status of EU citizens in Britain after the country leaves the EU. One particular point in the proposal gives a flavour of things to come. It should worry anyone, not just EU citizens.

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Market moving info — week starting July 10, 2017

Here’s a summary of last week’s market moving news and a look ahead to the data, events and earnings reports that are likely to move the markets in the week starting July 10, 2017.

Last week:          

  • The US economy created more jobs than expected, with 222,000 new positions in June compared with expectations of 178,000. But wage growth was tepid, at just 2.5%.

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