Tag Archives: financial markets

Care about ESG? Do not buy Bitcoin

With almost every investor out there claiming deep commitment to the environmental, social and governance (ESG) cause, one issue on which there is surprisingly little debate is that of cryptocurrencies.

Investor enthusiasm for these two new buzzwords in the investing world is high, but few people are ready to admit that they are mutually exclusive: you cannot claim to focus on ESG and own Bitcoin at the same time.

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Climate change could be the market’s next Black Swan

Even those who still do not believe that climate change is a serious threat to our way of living will need to pay attention: it could turn out to be the next Black Swan for financial markets.

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Counting the costs of Brexit starts with London

For whoever wants to see the real-life results of giving in to populism, the UK’s case is a fascinating one. Counting the costs of Brexit is only beginning, but already the picture is a gloomy one. 

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To understand (or prevent) the next crisis, read ‘The Money Formula’

Do you want to know how the next financial crisis will arrive, and how it could be prevented? In that case, read “The Money Formula“, a book by Paul Wilmott and David Orrell published earlier this year.

It shows you, with mathematical precision, what the financial world did not learn from the previous crisis. It also shows why it is so difficult for the rest of the world to catch them out.

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How to win the currency war of words

By Mirela Roman

Central bankers have been striving to bring inflation down for a long time. But ironically, they took a U-turn after the financial crisis and are now trying to heal the wounds via negative or near zero lower-bound rates, “unorthodox” stimulus such as quantitative easing or various forward guidance and communication techniques.

As words almost became monetary policy tools, prices continue to stay stubbornly low or on a downward path. But there is one thing that bucks the trend, and its swings are even more sensitive to the way central banks talk than those of inflation.

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