Tag Archives: mortgage debt

One third of British homebuyers don’t read mortgage contracts fully

One thing that becomes clear to a foreigner after even a short time in Britain is how obsessed people are with homeownership. Expressions like “getting on the housing ladder”, “you can’t go wrong with bricks and mortar” or “rent is throwing money away” are all too common.

Despite this obsession — or maybe because of it — it turns out that the British are not all that careful when it comes to making sure they fully read and understand the terms of their mortgage.

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Libor manipulation suit could open the floodgates

The news that the US Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) is suing European banks in London for manipulating Libor should worry central bankers everywhere.

It’s all hush-hush, with details coming from reports in newspapers, rather than made public officially. The Financial Times reported that the FDIC is suing Barclays, Deutsche Bank, Lloyds Banking Group, Royal Bank of Scotland, Rabobank and UBS, as well as the British Bankers’ Association, accusing them of fraudulent misrepresentation.

Lloyds said it doesn’t believe the claim has any merit, while the others did not comment, according to the report.

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The Eastern European scapegoat proves the EU is working

I was reading the other day on the blog of excellent Bucharest-based economist Radu Craciun his latest article: “Is Eastern Europe the EU’s scapegoat?” When I read the headline, I thought the article was about Brexit; but in fact, Radu writes about how some experts in the EU claim that the single currency was created as a way to maintain the unity of the Union after it expanded “too rapidly” to the East.

Well, that’s new. I didn’t realise that, besides causing English people to behave irrationally against their own interests and vote to leave the world’s biggest trading bloc, Eastern Europeans are also guilty of inspiring what could turn out to be the world’s least successful currency union.

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Central bankers are trapped by their own policies

It’s unclear when it all started, but it has reached the point where it would make the biggest banker of all times, John Pierpont Morgan, turn in his grave.

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New Basel rules mean buy-to-let mortgage interest rates will jump

Ahead of the Chancellor’s Budget set to be published on March 16, there is a lot of speculation that he may announce other measures to cool down the buy-to-let property market. I don’t think he will need to: the market will cool down pretty rapidly once the regulatory changes that are coming for banks are understood by buyers. Admittedly, that will take a while. This article is for those who want to stay ahead of the game.

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Eurozone banks are doing better, lending improves

One piece of good news about the eurozone has been overshadowed by the ongoing, Syriza-orchestrated drama on Greece: lending continues to improve, and with it, the prospects for the single currency area.

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UK household wealth jumps by 19% on house prices, stocks

UK household wealth surged by 19% in a year to reach 9.1 trillion pounds ($14.4 trillion) at the end of 2014, data from Lloyds Bank Private Banking show.

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